Rosemary Elementary School

District News

Updated Tue, Sep 29th

The Technology Department has opened TechHelp for all CampbellUSD students

TechHelp is an online portal that allows your student to connect directly with one of CampbellUSD's six Instructional Technology staff. The portal ensures that the entire IT team can see the problem you are reporting, and allows them to assign, solve or escalate accordingly. 

To begin using TechHelp, visit https://techhelp.campbellusd.org in a web browser and sign in with your student's full CampbellUSD email address and password. From there, you can choose a ticket category, write a helpful description of the problem you're facing, and someone from the IT team will receive the ticket and get to work. Based on the question, the team may refer tickets back to your site or individual teachers for school or classroom-specific issues.

If you do not know your [student’s email address  or password, you can look them up in the PowerSchool parent portal. Watch this PowerSchool parent portal tutorial video for more information on creating a PowerSchool Parent Portal account.

Updated Thu, Oct 29th

As students, teachers, and families work through the challenges of distance learning, some students are having an especially tough time academically and social-emotionally. This month, teachers at two schools—Sherman Oaks and Campbell School of Innovation—led the effort to provide in-person instruction to these vulnerable students prior to the district’s official transition to Phase 2.  

“In the spirit of equity, we must find ways to meet the needs of these students now,” said Marco Chavez, Principal of Sherman Oaks Dual Immersion School. 


Teacher Jeni Marty and aides work with
Sherman Oaks students

The school is rising to the challenge with its Specialized Learning Lab. Four weeks ago, Resource Specialist Jeni Marty launched the custom on-campus learning lab, using the District’s general Learning Labs as a model. Two groups of 10 Sherman Oaks students take part.

At Campbell School of Innovation (CSI), two Inclusion Specialists launched similar on-campus classes two weeks ago. Laura Hamer and Megan Noriega work with 14 students in the learning center. CSI Principal Kami Thordarson noted the benefits for the students and the teachers. 

teacher showing book to student
Teacher Megan Noriega discusses a lesson
with a student.

“Having teachers and instructional aides there with the students removes barriers that our struggling students were having with distance learning,” she said. “In a classroom, a teacher gets immediate feedback just by scanning the room. Getting that feedback through Zoom lessons is more challenging and takes much more time. This extra support helps the students and their teachers.” 

Success is clear for both schools. Students are more engaged, they are completing more assignments, and more teachers are creating ways to offer safe, in-person learning for their students.

student working on math problem with help from teacher
Student works on a math problem
with help from an aide.

This week at Sherman Oaks, fourth-grade teachers started a twice-a-week reading and English Language Development session. Also, Chavez and Assistant Principal Pablo Viramontes launched Español con los directores, a twice-weekly all-Spanish language session designed for students in grades TK-1st.

“We are very intentional about following the safety protocols and about identifying the students who need this kind of intervention,” said Chavez, noting that not everyone feels ready to be on campus.

“Offering these labs feels like we’re moving in the right direction,” said Assistant Principal Viramontes. “It’s a place to start. We plan; we adjust; we move forward.”

“These educators are providing an essential step forward in our plan to bring students back to campus gradually,” said Superintendent Shelly Viramontez. “We continue in our commitment to meet all of our students’ needs and educate them to their highest potential.”

Updated Tue, Oct 20th

student peeks around her paper of schoolworkMore students can access the marvels of Mystery Science curriculum now, thanks to the Assistance League Los Gatos-Saratoga.

Over 30 ALLGS volunteers created 34,000 individual student STEM Kits—compiling about 250,000 little pieces—for Campbell Union School District’s elementary students to use in distance learning this fall. 

Now, each Kindergarten through 5th grade student can perform five science experiments at home after a distance learning science lesson from their teacher. Topics range from leaves changing color, difference in bird beaks, to friction and pattern of motion and structure and function of the human eye. 

two students wearing masks and showing new kit bagsThe STEM Kits arrived at schools in early October, along with 1,500 volunteer-assembled Art/Writing Kits. The kits, made for grades Kindergarten through 2nd, include a writing journal, a book about Why We Stay Home during COVID-19, and fun art supplies that will support the District’s Every Child a Reader by Third Grade initiative. 

Producing tens of thousands of student kits was a major shift in program delivery for the Assistance League, whose volunteers would normally present student programs live in a classroom setting. 

"We are so grateful to the Assistance League for their support," said District Superintendent Shelly Viramontez. "Providing students with hands-on science kits is so beneficial, particularly now with so much of students' learning happening on the screen."

The Assistance League of Los Gatos-Saratoga mission is to Transform Lives and Support our Local Communities in need. For more information about the group’s philanthropic programs, please go to www.allgs.org.

Updated Thu, Oct 8th

flyer image with detailsThe County of Santa Clara offers a Free Flu Vaccine Fair (for ages 3 years and up) -- Free regardless of health insurance or immigration status. Open every Saturday, 9 AM – 4 PM, from Sept.19-Dec.12 (none on Nov. 28th) at the Santa Clara Fairgrounds, 344 Tully Rd, San Jose, CA 95111

El Condado de Santa Clara ofrece una Feria de Vacunas contra la Gripe gratis (para mayores de 3 años) - Gratis sin importar su seguro médico o estatus migratorio. Abierto todos los sábados, de 9 a. M. A 4 p. M., Del 19 de septiembre al 12 de diciembre (ninguno el 28 de noviembre) en el recinto ferial de Santa Clara, 344 Tully Rd, San José, CA 95111

Updated Tue, Oct 6th

On Friday, October 1st, Superintendent Viramontez emailed a video update to all families about the district's plans for moving to Phase 2 of the School Reopening Plan.

The video is on our district's YouTube channel (Campbellusd). Closed captions in English and Spanish are available by using the YouTube captioning tools.

Please visit our COVID-19 resources web page to view the full School Reopening Plan, which includes details about all safety protocols for returning to on-campus learning. The web page includes links to other resources, including parent resources and guidebooks from Santa Clara County Public Health in multiple languages.

We will share more information at the October 15 Governing Board meeting and continue to provide information as we go forward.

Updated Fri, Oct 2nd

Participating in the 2020 Census ensures our community’s fair share of federal funding for vital services, including healthcare, schools, roads, and more!

The data collected from the census is used to allocate over $800 billion in annual funding for these vital services. The deadline is now September 30th.
Complete your 10-minute questionnaire and tell your friends, family, and neighbors.

Visit my2020census.gov or call 844-330-2020. 

Updated Thu, Sep 24th

two boys doing yogaThe twin brothers follow along with a video yoga lesson as other mask-wearing students work on distance learning lessons on Chromebooks. Shellie Lansing, a Campbell Union School District employee, supervises the well-lit Learning Lab, with its desks spaced far apart.

“Coming here is cool!” says Emmett, an active first grader, who sits, stands, then sits again as he works through a project on his device.

The District’s Learning Labs are providing daytime supervision for 170 students, a few who are children of district employees and some who have had significant struggles with distance learning since the spring school closures. Registration is by invitation only, based on district criteria.

“We are thrilled to be able to provide this support to our students,” says district Superintendent Shelly Viramontez. “It is part of our commitment to equity and giving students what they need to be successful.” 

There are five Learning Lab locations across the district serving TK through 5th grade students from any school in the district. To keep student cohorts unique, each room holds 12-14 students who attend the same school. They follow their school’s schedule for their grade and have options like Go Noodle, yoga, and outdoor activities in assigned areas during breaks and lunchtime. students in masks walk through campus

Operating the Learning Labs is doing more than supporting learning. The labs are helping students and staff learn to follow the COVD-19 safety protocols in the district’s School Reopening Plan. Students’ daily routines include reminders about hand hygiene, staying six feet apart when moving about campus, and using assigned restrooms.

Even with these limitations, Isabella, a fifth grader, thinks coming to the Learning Lab is better than not coming “because you get to get out of the house for a while.” 

When asked how this year differs from fourth grade, her answer shows great empathy. Rather than mentioning the obvious—masks, distancing, and the virus—she says: “I didn’t know that some people don’t have the same technology. Like a family with five kids and two parents all trying to use the WiFi at the same time can really be a problem.”

“We’ve had a great experience with the Learning Labs,” says Kathleen Bagmanov, parent of two CSI students who attend the program at Capri School. “We are very careful about who we interact with, and it feels good to see that the staff have put in place everything they said they would,” she says. “The kids know the safety rules and follow them. My girls come home and tell me how often they wash their hands; they even forget to take their masks off at home.” students in learning lab

Bagmanov and her husband both work full time, which made helping their daughters with distance learning a tough job. When the opportunity to register for Learning Labs arose, she took action. 

“Now it’s so much better for staying on schedule. The kids don’t miss their Zoom session with the teacher anymore.” 

“Conditions in Santa Clara County are trending in a positive direction,” Viramontez says. “If they continue this way, we will be able to bring students back to campus under Phase 2 of our plan. The process will take several weeks and we will be very thoughtful and gradual about taking that next step.”

The Learning Labs are also saving jobs. Three bus drivers and other non-instructional staff, whose work stopped along with the pandemic’s shut downs, are now trained Learning Lab supervisors.

staff in mask at gateShellie Lansing, a district bus driver for 37 years, says she chose the job “because I like kids. Also, they’re usually all behind me. It’s nice to have them in front of me for a change.”

Through the training, Learning Lab staff gain new tech skills so they can assist students with logging in to their online lessons. 

“It’s been good,” she says. “I still hope to go back to a somewhat more regular life one day though.”

So do we all, Shellie. So do we all.

Updated Thu, Sep 17th

As Santa Clara County’s COVID19 conditions improve, our District Fall Reopening Planning Committee met to begin preparing for the potential of moving into the next phase of our school reopening plan. This process will take several weeks of preparations, so planning is necessary to be ready for change. The Fall Reopening Planning Committee met Wednesday afternoon to discuss the needs for doing this transition well. 

I shared with the group that—as we have said from the start—we are planning for a gradual, phased-in approach with the goal, which is also a legal requirement, of providing as much in-person instruction as is safely possible (EC 43504). 

In addition to reviewing the Reopening Plan phases, I shared that the waiver approval process involved vetting by State and local public health departments, giving us added confidence that we have addressed all required and recommended safety protocols and processes. Our Committee members take their role of representing the various constituents of our district seriously. They brought with them ideas, observations, and questions that would be important considerations in planning for a transition to the hybrid phase of reopening, which we are reviewing and incorporating into our planning. 

I explained that we are particularly interested in understanding the readiness of our community—families and employees—for gradually moving to in-person instruction on campus. The group suggested that a survey of families and staff would be a good next step for determining readiness for when to transition to our plan’s Phase 2 (hybrid). This survey will go out this Friday, Sept. 18th. 

Conditions in Santa Clara County are trending in a positive direction. If they continue this way, schools will be able to begin bringing students back to campus. We will be very thoughtful and responsive about taking the next step in our Reopening Plan.

The Fall Reopening Committee will reconvene Sept. 30 to review survey data and input from staff.

Updated Wed, Sep 16th

Distance learning—this new way for your student to do school—is a challenge for all of us, and we’re working it out together. To help families, we created a new video blog (vlog) as another way to answer parents’ frequently asked questions.

The September video is the first in a monthly series aimed at helping you and your student now and throughout the school year. Find it on YouTube or on our COVID-19 resource page.

September’s topics:

  • What are the expectations of my child’s teacher? 
  • What is my role as a Parent in Distance Learning? 
  • How do I get help? 
  • How can I get a computer and care of my device?

Note: For video closed captions in English or Spanish, choose YouTube's "cc" icon.

Updated Wed, Sep 16th

Positive school attendance is as important during distance learning as it is when students are physically in school. With this new way of teaching and learning, it is important that students are present, engaged and supported. 

Staff still takes attendance and tracks each child’s engagement each day. Maintaining morning and evening routines is a great way to support your child’s attendance and education.

Involve your child in developing a routine. For example:

  • The night before school, have your child help set up the work area, lay out materials, and check to ensure that their schoolwork is complete. Preparations done the night before help to ease the start of the next day.
  • In the morning, they can use an alarm clock to allow time for breakfast and then get settled at least 5-10 minutes before the first online session.

These routines can help when it comes time to transition back to in-person learning, also. For more positive attendance tips and ideas, visit our Attendance Awareness newsletter: